Policy Forum - Understanding Geographical Indications: What is the evidence?

Policy Forum - Understanding Geographical Indications: What is the evidence?

The EU and the USA/Australia/New Zealand disagree substantially on GI policy for foods. The critical issues are whether foods should have strong-form (TRIPS Article 23) style protection, and whether names that have become generic can be re-claimed. This disagreement has been one factor in the lack of progress in the Doha Development Round. The ANU Centre for European Studies (ANUCES) is currently running a project, with the support of the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union, to identify the evidence base on the real-world impact of geographical indication (GI) labelling.

The purpose of this project is to marshal and assess the evidence as to the impact of GI policy. The focus is on:

1) whether producers are able to achieve a higher net income from the use of GIs; and
2) what are the GI impacts on rural and regional prosperity.

Empirical research to date is sparse and scattered. It suggests that the impact of GIs on both producers and regional prosperity is variable and contingent. The ANUCES has undertaken an extensive review of the available empirical evidence about the economic impact of GI labelling. This Policy Forum will present this evidence and draw out the main policy and trade negotiation implications. It will also identify the major areas where there is a lack of knowledge so that future policy-oriented research can be well directed.

As a secondary part of the project, ANUCES is investigating the use of GIs in North-East Asia. A number of countries in this region appear to have a terroir concept similar to that in France, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Greece. Preliminary results of this research, focusing on the history of regional speciality tributes in China will be presented.
 

Schedule:

  • 9 – 9.15am: Registration and coffee
  • 9.15 – 9.30am: Welcome and overview, Annmarie Elijah
  • 9.30 – 10am: The size of the GI market, Hazel Moir
  • 10 – 10.30am: Willingness to pay a GI premium, Áron Török
  • 10.30 – 10.45am: Morning tea
  • 10.45 – 11.30am: The impact of GIs on producer and rural prosperity: what we do and don’t know, Áron Török, Fillipo Arfini
  • 11.30am – 12pm: GIs in China, Wenting Cheng
  • 12 – 1pm: Policy and trade implications of the GI evidence, panel discussion moderated by Annmarie Elijah
  • 1pm:Close and lunch

 

Biographies

Ms Wenting Cheng
Wenting Cheng is a Visiting Fellow at the ANU Centre for European Studies, and a PhD candidate at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) in the ANU College of Asia and
the Pacific.

Dr Áron Török
Dr Áron Török is a Visiting Fellow at ANU Centre for European Studies for the Geographical Indications Jean Monnet project. Dr Török has come to ANU from Corvinus University of Budapest in Hungary where he is an Assistant Professor. Dr Török has a PhD in Agricultural Economics.

Professor Filippo Arfini
Filippo Arfini is Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Policies in the Department of Economics and Management at the University of Parma. He is Deputy of the H2020 Strength2Food Project, and author of a number of publications on the issue of GIs and their implication on Rural Development.
 

Date & time

Thu 21 Jun 2018, 9am–1pm

Location

The Nye Hughes Room ANU Centre for European Studies The Australian National University Building #67C, 1 Liversidge Street Acton ACT 2601

Contacts

ANU Centre for European Studies
+61 2 6125 9896

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Updated:  19 June 2018/Responsible Officer:  Head of School/Page Contact:  CASS Marketing & Communications