School of Politics and International Relations - Events

01
Dec
2017

Exploring Sources for the Consolidation or Deconsolidation of Democracy in East Asia

After decades of consolidation across the world, democratic systems face apparent threats in the form of authoritarian leaders and dissatisfied citizens. Spanning countries with vastly differing levels of democratic development, Asia is particularly susceptible to the risks of democratic deconsolidation. The School of Politics and International Relations invites all interested guests to attend this workshop, in which researchers from the... Read more

02
Nov
2017

Building Election Management Body Capacity

Election management bodies (EMBs) are the agencies and government departments tasked with the technical administration of elections, from registering voters to counting ballots. This talk will present a new approach to comparing election management bodies (EMBs) in cross-national perspective by measuring their capacity to deliver key services and perform their essential functions. It does so using three novel approaches: first, analysis of data... Read more

26
Oct
2017

Prominent in Parliament? An Empirical Assessment of Interest Group Prominence in the Legislative Arena

In densely populated organised interest systems groups, being acknowledged by policy makers as a prominent player is important. If being viewed as relevant by policy makers is a critical ingredient of political advocacy, this raises the question for interest group scholars: Why are some groups more prominent than others among policy makers? In this paper we introduce an additional approach (to the existing focus on involvement and access... Read more

19
Oct
2017

Consideration Set Models for Electoral Choice: An Introduction

(From the ‘Introduction’ in a forthcoming Electoral Studies symposium, co-edited with Martin Rosema.) In electoral research decisions by voters are usually analysed as if they choose at once from the whole set of competing parties or candidates. Consideration Set Models (CSM) posit that voters choose differently, namely in two stages. In the first stage they exclude certain choice options and create a consideration set of viable options, while... Read more

12
Oct
2017

Measuring the latent ideological dimensions of American voters over time

There have been significant shifts in the electoral coalitions assembled by the Democratic and Republican parties in recent decades, with implications for how these parties govern when in office. To better understand these changes, we estimate the latent ideological preferences of American voters over 40 years, and examine the changing association between issue preferences and partisan choice for subgroups of voters. We do this using the... Read more

29
Sep
2017

“The Toronto 18” Case Study: The Challenges and Pitfalls of Terrorism Research

Conducting research in the field of terrorism studies faces several methodological challenges. This paper highlights some of these challenges through a re-examination of the disrupted 2006 “Toronto 18” terrorist plot in Canada. An in-depth case study of this plot was created in 2010 and re-visiting this case for the ten-year anniversary uncovered new and previously unreleased information. This provided new insight into several key aspects of the... Read more

28
Sep
2017

The Australian Regime for Fiscal Federalism: Can it be Exported?

The Australian regime for horizontal fiscal equalisation (HFE) is administered by the Commonwealth Grants Commission. OECD rates it as one of the most egalitarian in the world. I define HFE, introduce the Australian regime, discuss some current challenges to it, and assess how suitable it would be for other federations or quasi-federations such as the United Kingdom. The UK arrangements for distributing untied block grant to Scotland, Wales, and... Read more

21
Sep
2017

Whither Global Health in the Trump Era?

Over the course of a generation, global health has moved from being regarded as peripheral to international politics to assuming a prominent place on the global political agenda. Since the election of Donald Trump in the United States and his demonstrated antipathy toward multilateralism and global health programs, it is worth questioning whether Trump’s ascendancy signifies the demise of global health’s role in international politics. In this... Read more

14
Sep
2017

A Cause Worth Fighting For: The Contribution of Female Combatants to Rebel Success

Several studies suggest that armed resistance movements deploy female fighters because doing so offers specific strategic or tactical advantages; however, little is known about the potential impact of female fighters on the group’s ability to achieve its objectives. I therefore investigate this relationship in this manuscript. I identify several plausible mechanisms through which the presence of female fighters potentially influences the... Read more

31
Aug
2017

South Australia’s Federation Referendum of 1898: A Quantitative Empirical Enquiry

The paper uses data from the 1901 census to throw light of the attributes of electors and electorates that encouraged or discouraged voting Yes in the 1898 SA federation referendum. It is concluded that British birth and an industrial occupation contributed powerfully to voting No in 1898. It is also concluded that in the 1899 referendum industrial occupation disappeared as a discouragement to voting Yes. William Coleman is a Reader at the... Read more

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