School of Politics and International Relations - Events

25
Aug
2017

Trust, Parties and Leaders: Findings from the 1987-2016 Australian Election Study

Political trust is a major issue in contemporary democracies and Australia is no exception. The most recent Australian Election Study found that public satisfaction with democracy and trust in politicians had reached some of the lowest levels ever recorded. The results are indicative of rising popular disaffection with the political class, as has emerged dramatically in Britain and the United States. Drawing upon Australian Election Study... Read more

24
Aug
2017

Can the Image and Practice Turn in International Relations Meet?: Understanding Military Scandal Images and Band of Brothers Culture

The study of images has proliferated in international relations, particularly in the last decade. However, much of this literature treats images as static artefacts and ignores the practices associated with the production, circulation, and consumption of images. This article calls for an engagement between the so-called visual and practice turns in international relations. It offers a new method of visual-practice discourse analysis and applies... Read more

17
Aug
2017

Exploring the Relationship Between Policy Representation and Political Trust: Evidence from Vote Compass

Modern notions of representative democracy are based on the normative assumption that there is a relationship between the preferences of citizens on key electoral issues and the policies offered and pursued by the major political parties that form government. Such notions are central to both normative and practical considerations of democracy. In this paper we ask two questions as they relate to debates about democratic representation: 1. Do... Read more

10
Aug
2017

China and the international economic order: Bretton Woods, Bandung and beyond

It is commonly argued that China is rising within an international economic order not of its own creation. Yet, Nationalist China played an influential role in the development of the ‘Bretton Woods’ institutions – the International Monetary Fund, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade – created in the dying days of World War II. Similarly, the People’s Republic of China played a... Read more

03
Aug
2017

Can China Democratise?

These are dark days for advocates of democracy in China. Crackdowns against freedoms of speech, assembly, and thought have intensified under President Xi Jinping, while Western governments are increasingly muted in their response. This makes it even more important to discuss openly the subject of whether and how China could democratise, and the changes necessary for minimalist democracy to emerge. This presentation will examine these issues from... Read more

27
Jul
2017

Mass Media as a Source of Public Responsiveness

There is a sizable literature finding evidence of public responsiveness to policy change, across a range of salient policy domains and countries. We have a very limited sense for what drives this aggregate-level responsiveness, however. One possibility is that individuals learn at least part of what they need to know from mass media. Work tends to emphasize failures in both media coverage, and citizens; but there is little work exploring the... Read more

25
May
2017

Compulsory Voting Rules, Reluctant Voters and Ideological Proximity Voting

Political theorists have argued that democracies should strive for high turnout, leading to an argument for the introduction of compulsory voting, one of the surest ways to increase turnout. Others have warned that this obligation comes at a cost of lower quality votes. We investigate these claims by examining the impact of compulsory voting on proximity voting. First, we examine individuals’ voting behavior in three countries with strong... Read more

18
May
2017

Populism and Press Freedom

What is the relationship between populist rule and the freedom of the press? Populists are personalistic leaders who seek to gain and retain power by establishing unmediated links with mass constituencies, who are otherwise relatively free of existing party and institutional ties. Populists rely heavily on the media to mobilize popular support and thus face strong incentives to control and dominate the press. Using a new dataset on populist rule... Read more

04
May
2017

Gender, Anxiety, and Attitudes to Terrorism

Social dominance orientation (SDO) measures individuals’ preference for inter-group hierarchies; that is, the idea that some groups in society should rightly dominate other groups. This study examines the role of SDO in explaining anxiety about experiencing a terrorist attack, and support for counter-terrorism policies that potentially infringe individual liberties in seeking to defend community security. It also examines the role of gender in... Read more

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