People

Convenors

Dr April Biccum
April Biccum is a Lecturer in Postcolonial International Relations, her research brings postcolonial theory into the study of International Relations with a focus on political communication and political mobilisation in the study of Empire and Global Citizenship, looking specifically at the conceptualisation and theorisation of empire and imperialism and the politics of knowledge embedded in Global Citizenship Education. April's books include Global Citizenship and the Legacy of Empire (2013) Routledge.
Dr Nick Cheesman
Nick Cheesman is a scholar of politics and law in mainland Southeast Asia, in particular, Myanmar. His current research project is about how torture relates to political order. His work is concerned generally with how language animates actions, how categories determine meanings, and how ideas constitute practices. His books include Interpreting Communal Violence in Myanmar (ed) (Routledge, 2018), and Opposing the Rule of Law: How Myanmar's Courts Make Law and Order (Cambridge, 2015).


Affiliates

Professor Desmond Manderson
Professor Desmond Manderson is jointly appointed in the ANU Colleges of Law and of Arts & Social Sciences at the Australian National University. He directs the interdisciplinary Centre for Law, Arts and the Humanities, designing innovative interdisciplinary courses with English, philosophy, art history, and political theory, and pursuing collaborative projects with the National Library, the National Gallery, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and the Street Theatre. His books include From Mr Sin to Mr Big (1993); Songs Without Music: Aesthetic dimensions of law and justice (2000); Proximity, Levinas, and the Soul of Law (2006); and Kangaroo Courts and the Rule of Law (2012). Recent scholarship examines the intersection of law and the visual arts, notably Law and the Visual: Representations, Technologies and Critique (Toronto 2018); and Temporalities of Law in the Visual Arts (Cambridge 2018).
Dr Melissa Lovell
Dr Melissa Lovell is a political scientist with expertise in the fields of Indigenous Affairs governance, social policy, and political ideology. Her research draws on a range of interpretive and qualitative traditions of research--including post-structuralism and post/colonial studies—to investigate the role that ideas about risk, vulnerability and capability play in contemporary political debates about Indigenous peoples’ development. Her research draws on case studies from a wide range of policy fields including welfare, criminal justice, education and employment. Dr Lovell completed her PhD in political science in the School of Politics at ANU in 2012, and has taught courses in political ideas, social policy, political theory and introductory political science at the Australian National University and the University of Canberra. She is currently employed as Convenor and Research Fellow at the Freilich Foundation at the Australian National University, which exists for the study of all kinds of bigotry and the promotion of diversity and inclusion.
Dr Anna Olsen
Anna Olsen is a Senior Fellow at the Research School of Population Health. She teaches qualitative research methodology and analysis and supervises qualitative and mixed methods post-graduate students across ANU. Her theoretical background lies in the social science of health and illness, interpretive methodologies and mixed methods.  Working in public health Anna has published in the fields of illicit drug use, women’s health, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, research ethics and inequalities of health.
Dr Cathy Banwell
Cathy Banwell is Associate Professor, at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health. Her main research activities include: socio-cultural contributions to population health; consumptogenic environments and health practices in Australia and Thailand and reproductive health, family and social issues for women who use drugs.
Dr Paulo Ravecca
Paulo Ravecca is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the Universidad de la República, Uruguay, where he researches epistemology and the history of political science; critical theories (queer, neo-marxist, postcolonial, and poststructural approaches); political economy and international relations; as well as gender and sexuality. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Narrative Politics and Crítica Contemporánea. Revista de Teoría Política. Ravecca is the author of The Politics of Political Science: Rewriting Latin American Experiences (Routledge: Forthcoming). He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from York University.

Updated:  4 August 2018/Responsible Officer:  Head of School/Page Contact:  CASS Marketing & Communications